24 Feb

What makes an economy resilient? Lessons learned after the 2008 crisis and what it means for today

Since shocks cannot be avoided and are likely to occur more frequently in the future, it is crucial to strengthen economic resilience – “the ability of a country to withstand a shock and recover quickly to its potential [growth] after it falls into recession” – on national and regional levels. 

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Investing in people, public services and the business environment (including, crucially digital infrastructure) are appealing ways to achieve longer-term growth through making Hungarians and the Hungarian economy more productive. These types of policies respond to the challenges that were highlighted by the pandemic and can be helpful during the recovery but have the potential to spur further economic growth, writes Daniel Prinz. 

In 2030, the last electricity produced from coal will flow in Eastern Greater Poland. In 2040 this part of the second largest Polish voivodeship intends to achieve climate neutrality. "It's not PR. We have it all carefully thought out", emphasizes the co-author of the strategy.

Awareness of the dangers of climate change is growing in the Visegrad countries. The vast majority of the inhabitants of these countries also want climate neutrality in the European Union by 2050. However, this does not yet mean that the same number of them is ready to make consumer choices that limit their environmental and climate impact.

Within the Recovery Plan in the field of digitization, the Slovak government emphasizes state´s IT. However, private companies affected by the corona crisis are wondering how the targeted support for industry - that is still lagging behind in digitization - will look like. They have now presented their own proposals to the government.

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